May 1, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

That’s the Word For It: Contronym

Have you ever thought about why fast means quick and at the same time means to immobilize? When a word or phrase means its opposite as well, it is called a contronym. Slang employs this kind of inversion of meaning, take for instance the word ‘sick’ or ‘wicked’ now used to convey something awesome or cool.

Here’s a list of contronyms.

Check out this usage of the word:

Sometimes, just to heighten the confusion, the same word ends up with contradictory meanings. This kind of word is called a contronymSanction, for instance, can either signify permission to do something or a measure forbidding it to be done. Cleave can mean cut in half or stick together. A sanguine person is either hotheaded and bloodthirsty or calm and cheerful. Something that is fast is either stuck firmly or moving quickly.— Bill BrysonThe Mother Tongue1990

April 30, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Readers can’t Digest-Week 228 (24-April to 30-April)

1. Tolkien film-makers insist they were respectful after estate disavows biopic

you shall not pass lord of the rings GIF

2. Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist revealed

sea otter good job GIF by Justin

3. Google expands the Assistant’s storytelling feature to mobile phones

light phone GIF by ailadi

4. Lost ‘Sequel’ to ‘A Clockwork Orange’ discovered

stanley kubrick alex GIF

5. Microsoft stops selling ebooks and will refund customers for previous purchases

finish him black and white GIF by Feliks Tomasz Konczakowski

April 26, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers- Ambelin Kwaymullina

Want to embed this post on your blog or website? Use the following code.
<div style="text-align: center; margin: auto;">
<href=https://i0.wp.com/instascribe.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ambelin.png?resize=410%2C1024&ssl=1" alt="Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers - Ambelin Kwaymullina">
By InstaScribe
</a></div>

April 25, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Checking Channels: You’re Booked with Daisy Buchanan

For some light-hearted banter about books on authors’ bookshelves, You’re Booked is the perfect podcast for literary nosy parkers. Daisy Buchanan plays Book Inspector and interviews primarily British authors about the first forbidden books on their list. She talks about the readerly secrets one tends to hide, For instance, in an interview with Nikesh Shukla, readers understand what he really thinks about The Great American Novel.

Nowadays, it is hard to hear what an author really feels. Usually, we get a whitewashed version of it.

Listen to the podcast here.

once upon a time spoilers GIF

 

 

April 24, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

That’s the Word for It: Parsimonious

Parsimonious refers to frugality and it also means making a minimum number of assumptions. The sports reference is to not conceding goals.

Here are some mentions of the word in literature.

“Earthly nature may be parsimonious, but the human mind is prodigal, itself an anomaly that in its wealth of error as well as of insight is exceptional, utterly unique as far as we know, properly an object of wonder.”
― Marilynne Robinson

“You have read Darwin,” I said. “But you read him misunderstandingly when you conclude that the struggle for existence sanctions your wanton destruction of life.” He shrugged his shoulders. “You know you only mean that in relation to human life, for of the flesh and the fowl and the fish you destroy as much as I or any other man. And human life is in no wise different, though you feel it is and think that you reason why it is. Why should I be parsimonious with this life which is cheap and without value? There are more sailors than there are ships on the sea for them, more workers than there are factories or machines for them. Why, you who live on the land know that you house your poor people in the slums of cities and loose famine and pestilence upon them, and that there still remain more poor people, dying for want of a crust of bread and a bit of meat (which is life destroyed), than you know what to do with. Have you ever seen the London dockers fighting like wild beasts for a chance to work?”
― Jack London, The Sea Wolf By Jack London

Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers – Valeria Luiselli

April 19, 2019 by Neelima | 0 comments

Want to embed this post on your blog or website? Use the following code.
<div style="text-align: center; margin: auto;">
<href=https://i0.wp.com/instascribe.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Valeria.png?resize=410%2C1024&ssl=1" alt="Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers - Valeria Luiselli">
By InstaScribe
</a></div>

April 18, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Pearls and their Dark Origins @ Link Wanderlust

One of the most fascinating fairytales I’ve read is The Ugly Duckling, a tale of transformation.  In The Ugly History of Beautiful Things, Katy Kelleher talks about another kind of ugly thing: a pearl whose birth is from a rather unattractive mollusk.

Pearls have been considered an exotic item and weren’t as inexpensive as they have become today.

“Pearls were once mystical objects, believed by some to be the tears of Eve, by others to be the tears of Aphrodite. There are stories of pearls falling out of women’s mouths when they utter sweet words, and pearls appearing from the spray of sea foam as a goddess is born. Now we know better: pearls are made from some of the basic and common building blocks of nature — calcium, carbon, oxygen, arranged into calcium carbonate particles, bund together by organic proteins. They are created out of animal pain, which has been sublimated into something iridescent and smooth, layered and lovely. Born of irritation, these gemstones can be mass-produced and purchased with the click of a button.”

Kelleher dissects nacre, the hard element that creates the layers that give a pearl its structure. Besides the scientific angle, pearls have always been associated with the feminine. In reality, an oyster is forced into creating a pearl by commercial pearl farmers and so it is a product of much pain.

Read The Ugly History of Beautiful Things: Pearls by Katy Kelleher. There are more ugly histories by the same author in case you are wondering.

 

 

 

April 17, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

That’s the Word for It: Commentariat

This word is relatively new, used in 1993 and is a term journalists use to talk about the reporters who comment on the news. Mostly commentariat is used in reference to commentators on American political affairs. The word is a  blend of commentator with the suffix -ariat.

My basic hypothesis is this: the people who run the media are Humanities graduates with little understanding of science, who wear their ignorance as a badge of honor. Secretly, deep down, perhaps they resent the fact that they have denied themselves access to the most significant developments in the history of Western thought from the past two hundred years. There is an attack implicit in all media coverage of science – in their choice of stories, and the way they cover them. The media create a parody of science. On this template, science is portrayed as groundless, incomprehensible didactic truth statements from scientists – who, themselves, are socially- powerful, arbitrary un-elected authority figures. They are detached from reality. They do work that is either wacky, or dangerous, but either way, everything in science is tenuous, contradictory, probably going to change soon and – most ridiculously – hard to understand. Having created this parody, the Commentariat then attack it, as if they were genuinely critiquing what science is all about.”
― Ben Goldacre, Bad Science

“Unfortunately the epistemological standards of common sense—we should credit the people and ideas that make correct predictions, and discount the ones that don’t—are rarely applied to the intelligentsia and commentariat, who dispense opinions free of accountability.”
― Steven Pinker, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress.

April 16, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Readers can’t Digest-Week 227 (10-April to 16-April)

1. Indies dominate Jhalak Prize shortlist

bob dylan GIF by Head Like an Orange

2. Rathbones Folio Prize Shortlist: Eight Works in Fiction and Nonfiction

what do you mean GIF

3. Man Booker International shortlist dominated by female authors and translators

talk show yes GIF by iOne Digital

4. Women dominate Commonwealth Short Story Prize shortlist

champions league dancing GIF by VfL Wolfsburg

5. JK Rowling backs crime writing scheme for BAME and working-class women

harry potter dreams GIF

 

April 12, 2019
by Neelima
0 comments

Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers- N. K. Jemisin

Want to embed this post on your blog or website? Use the following code.
<div style="text-align: center; margin: auto;">
<href=https://i0.wp.com/instascribe.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/nkjemisin.png?resize=410%2C1024&ssl=1" alt="Visual Friday: Diverse Women Writers - N. K. Jemisin">
By InstaScribe
</a></div>